Dmitry Chernov conducts research aiming at overcoming the challenges of risk information transmission within large technological companies before industrial accidents.
A number of factors in the structure and culture of an organization can discourage or prevent clear communication about risk:
INTERNAL ECOLOGY OF AN ORGANIZATION:
  • Short-term financial & managerial objectives
  • Unrealistic projections of future development
  • A permanent “rush work” culture
  • A culture of “success at any price” and “no bad news”
  • “Ivory tower syndrome”: a fragmentary perception of the whole picture of risks among senior managers
  • Insufficient specific knowledge and experience among members of boards of directors
  • Weak internal control within the organization
  • Habituation (lack of a realistic perspective on problems because nothing has gone wrong in the past)
  • Wishful thinking / self-suggestion / self-deception among decision makers
RISK COMMUNICATION CHANNELS:
  • Long chains of communication for risk information
  • No internal or external incentives for whistleblowers
  • Poor inter-organization risk transmission
  • Absence of direct horizontal communication between departments of an organization
RISK ASSESSMENT AND RISK KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT:
  • Absence of a prompt industry-wide risk assessment system
  • Unwillingness to investigate the causes of an accident in detail
  • Ignorance among critical personnel and managers of other accidents or near-miss cases within the organization, the industry and abroad
  • Absence of a risk knowledge and risk assessment management system (accumulation, systemization and transmission of existing knowledge)
PERSONAL FEATURES OF MANAGERS AND EMPLOYEES:
  • Pressure to “look good” in the eyes of superiors
  • Reluctance to admit personal mistakes because of fear of being seen as incompetent
  • Unrealistic projections of personal performance
  • Fear of criminal prosecution if a serious mistake comes to light
Another direction of Dmitry Chernov’s research is the development of effective solutions regarding managerial decisions and crisis information response measures after industrial accidents:
MOST COMMON MANAGERIAL MISTAKES
DURING A DEVELOPING CRISIS SITUATION:
  • Delayed response to a crisis
  • Attempts to evade responsibility
  • Absence of executives at the site of an accident
  • Rejection of outside help
  • Information vacuum about an accident, which generates rumors and panic
  • Unwillingness to take responsibility for dealing with the consequences of an accident
PRIORITY ACTIONS FOR SENIOR MANAGEMENT
IN THE FIRST HOURS AFTER AN INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENT:
  • Obtaining reliable information from the affected industrial site
  • Remote control over the implementation of contingency plans
  • Timely release of the first official comment from the organization
  • Immediate arrival of senior management at the affected site
  • Deployment of crisis response headquarters
  • Cooperation with different government officials at the affected site
  • Care and treatment of victims of an accident
  • Preliminary forecast of the recovery of the affected site
CRISIS INFORMATION RESPONSE MEASURES:
  • Releasing official information about an accident to the public
  • Gathering detailed information about an accident within an organization
  • Agreeing on a united official position within an organization about an accident
  • Interaction with media in the first hours and days after an accident
  • Media management from the first week to one year after an accident
  • Information support for any litigation following an accident